Aichi AUS118 Knife Steel
Composition Analysis Graph, Equivalents And Overview

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AUS118(Aichi) - One more alloy from AUS-xxx series. AUS-118 has the second highest amount of Carbon in AUS -xxx series of steels. However, it's quite high on Chromium too, and resistance to corrosion doesn't suffer compared to Aichi AUS-10 stainless steel, which is the only AUS steel having more Carbon than AUS-118. Also worth noting 1.30-1.50% Molybdenum in the alloy, which is a good carbide former and aids with both resistance to corrosion and brittleness. Decent alloy on its own, but very rare in knives, not so sure why. Perhaps the price/availability is the reason. CRKT used to make at least one folder out of it, but since they they opted for far less attractive choices including AUS4, AUS6, not to mention 3Cr13. Takefu VG-10 steel is similar and much more popular than AUS-118, although worth noticing VG-10 contains Cobalt which is missing in AUS-118, but AUS-118 has more Molybdenum.

Manufacturing Technology - Ingot

Country - Japan(JP)

Known Aliases:
Aichi - AUS-118

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